Articles Tagged with Ohio DUI Cases

Blood-draw-3-300x200Police officers in Georgia are being trained to draw blood from drivers suspected of DUI (called ‘OVI’ in Ohio).  Typically, a person arrested for OVI in Ohio is taken to a police station for a breath test or urine test.  Occasionally, an OVI suspect is taken to a hospital for a blood test.  In Georgia, DUI suspects will now have their blood drawn by police officers.  Could we soon have police officers drawing blood from OVI suspects in Ohio?

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Water-bottle-in-car-300x200Ohio may need a new acronym for impaired driving.  Our state has used various drunk driving abbreviations in the past.  There was ‘DUI’ for Driving Under the Influence and then ‘OMVI’ for Operating a Motor Vehicle Intoxicated.  Now that Ohio law does not require the vehicle to be motorized, we use ‘OVI’ for Operating a Vehicle under the Influence.  In the future, the acronym may be ‘OVD’ for Operating a Vehicle Dehydrated.  A study published in Physiology & Behavior suggests dehydrated driving is similar to intoxicated driving.

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Traffic-Camera-300x200Some municipalities in Ohio have used unfair procedures for enforcing traffic violations detected by cameras.  The Ohio General Assembly addressed that unfairness by creating a new process for traffic camera violations.  Not all municipalities are following the new rules.  Recently, a municipal court judge found the Village of Brice did not comply with the newly mandated rules.  In an ironic twist, Brice complained to the Court of Appeals that the Village was denied due process in the municipal court proceeding.

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Police-at-convenience-store-300x200There are many different ways somebody can find themselves as the subject of an OVI/DUI investigation. The most common is when an officer witnesses a driver commit a traffic offense, initiates a traffic stop, and then conducts an investigation based on their observations of the driver. Other times, an officer will conduct the traffic stop after receiving a tip from someone that a particular driver may be impaired. How precise do these tips need to be to justify a traffic stop? How much corroborating evidence does an officer need to corroborate the tip? The Ohio Supreme Court recently weighed in on these questions in State v. Tidwell.

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3-300x271When a defendant appeals a DUI conviction (called ‘OVI’ in Ohio), the defendant often claims the judge made an erroneous ruling regarding a motion to suppress. The appellate court then reviews the suppression issue decided by the judge to determine whether the judge’s decision was erroneous. When the issue involves a ‘finding of fact’ by the judge, the appellate court evaluates whether the finding was supported by competent, credible evidence. Two recent Ohio cases illustrate this appellate evaluation with opposite outcomes. Continue Reading

Officer-on-steps-of-DC-building-1-275x300Qualified Immunity, a defense used by police officers in civil rights lawsuits, is a topic not typically discussed in this blog.  However, as a criminal defense lawyer, I have been asked about Qualified Immunity due to recent events in the United States.  In addition, an individual who files a lawsuit based on a false OVI arrest may encounter this defense.  Accordingly, I have asked attorney Eric Hollway to provide a guest article on Qualified Immunity.  Mr. Holloway, a civil rights lawyer who represents clients in false arrest claims, prepared the remainder of this article.

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Accident-Investigation-300x200A few days before the Kansas City Chiefs were to play in the Super Bowl, assistant coach Britt Reid (son of head coach Andy Reid) was involved in a three-car accident which left a five-year-old in critical condition.  Earlier this month, Britt Reid was charged with the felony offense of ‘DWI-Serious Physical Injury’.  While this incident occurred in Missouri, the investigation which led to the charge is essentially the same as a Vehicular Assault investigation in Ohio.

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Ohio-DUI-OVI-Guide-COVER-FRONT-228x300Many people charged with DUI (called ‘OVI’ in Ohio), especially those charged with a first offense, feel like they are in the dark. They do not understand the elements and consequences of OVI, and they do not know what to expect in the court process. They also are uncertain about whether to hire a lawyer and how to find a good defense attorney. I recently published a new book, the Ohio DUI/OVI Guide, which answers most of the questions people ask in this situation. My hope is that those who read the guide will no longer be in the dark.

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Urine-sample-250x300When people think of a DUI charge (called ‘OVI’ in Ohio), most think of drunk driving. This is where the bulk of the money and effort have been concentrated to raise awareness:  think of the “Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving” or “Over the Limit, Under Arrest” advertising campaigns. However, with more states legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, more people are finding themselves charged with OVI stemming from alleged marijuana impairment. This is a trend we have been following for some time. For people charged with a Marijuana OVI, a frequent question is: How long is THC detectable in your system?

 

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Datamaster-and-evidence-ticket-300x228A police officer discarded evidence that a DUI suspect blew under the ‘legal limit’. According to WCNC, the suspect was involved in a one-car accident and pulled her vehicle into a gas station parking lot. An officer went to the gas station and had the suspect perform field sobriety tests. The officer took the suspect into custody and administered multiple breath tests. The officer obtained two evidence tickets with results from the breath tests. The officer threw-out the evidence ticket with a result ‘under the limit’, kept the evidence ticket with a result ‘over the limit’, and charged the suspect with DUI (called ‘OVI’ in Ohio).

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